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USA Today
Uber and Lyft like to say they have a positive effect on traffic congestion, but there really isn't much evidence to back up that claim. Video provided by Newsy              
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USA Today
Men and women aren't on the same page about finances.              
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The New York Times
The London museum will stay open around the clock for the exhibition, which surveys the career of the fashion designer Alexander McQueen and closes on Aug. 2.
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USA Today
Secure your online banking by making sure you have a strong, unique password.              
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The Wall Street Journal
Aetna agreed to buy Humana for $34.1 billion, following weeks of frenzied merger talks among large health insurers. Deal would add to Aetna’s Medicare business.
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Treasury Notes
A year ago, Congress passed the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014, or the DATA Act . Since then, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Department of the Treasury (Treasury) have engaged with the communities that create and use this data and taken important first steps towards creating a more data driven government, and making federal data more transparent and available to the American people. Today marks the beginning of the next phase of implementation of the DATA Act. Rolling Out Data Standards Currently, the Federal Government produces huge amounts of data about how it spends money, but in some cases the same words are used in different ways. These inconsistencies make it difficult to use this data in a comprehensive way. Over a two-year period, starting today, the DATA Act requires Federal agencies to streamline this fragmentation and report Federal funds, broken down into specific categories lik e how much funding an agency receives from Congress and how much they are spending on specific projects and awards. It also requires agencies to use common government-wide data standards when posting that information to USAspending.gov – standards that aren't currently applied across all agencies for all uses. Today   we are beginning the rollout of 57 data standards. Some are final based on public input we have already received, and others will require additional input as we finalize them this summer. As a result of input from our partners in Congress, industry stakeholders, federal agencies, and taxpayers through feedback on our public GitHub collaboration space ,   15 final data standard s  available today will be used by all agencies for all federal spending data posted on USAspending.gov, the Federal Government’s one-stop shop for spending data.  We are also releasing 12 additional proposed data standards and 30 existing data elements that we are in the process of standardizing across the government. Conversation and collaboration with the public has been key to our progress thus far and we encourage you to visit our online collaboration space   on GitHub for more information on these proposed standards. In addition to data standards, we have been testing new formats for exchanging data across the Federal Government. In particular, Treasury’s pilots have demonstrated how we can digitally tag award data through the extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL) format. This process is called the DATA Act Schema   and it has been released   online and will continue to be refined with public input. Helping Agencies & the DATA Act Playbook To ensure the government has the necessary tools to adopt these standards within the two-year timeline, OMB also issued guidance to agencies on Increasing Transparency of Federal Spending by Making Federal Spending Data Accessible, Searchable, and Reliable . And to assist agencies with implementation, Treasury created a DATA Act Playbook with eight key steps that, if followed together, will help agencies leverage existing capabilities to drive implementation of the DATA Act. Treasury will continue to refine the Playbook and will hold meetings and workshops with agencies to provide updates on DATA Act activities, encourage agency collaboration, and share important insights and information. Finally, leveraging the leadership of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), we have begun a pilot program to test and explore ways to simplify the reporting process for recipients of federal grants. We are approaching this pilot in a non-traditional way, with the goal of using the next two years to identify and test multiple ways to improve.  To start, today, we have launched a repository for common data elements and a new section of Grants.gov  with information about the grants lifecycle, which will test how data standards can translate to actual time saved in reporting and how to put all information about Federal grants in one place. While we are pleased with the progress that has been made so far on the DATA Act implementation within existing budgetary resources, this is a complex project with challenges ahead. T he FY 2016 Budget proposes $84 million to allow agencies to make progress in implementing the DATA Act and increase Federal spending transparency. With better data, we will make better decisions and ensure that every dollar is well spent. For more information about our efforts under the DATA Act and how the public can participate, please visit USAspending HERE . David Mader is the Controller of the Office of Federal Financial Management at the White House Office of Management and Budget. David Lebryk is the Fiscal Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. ​
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Treasury Notes
This week, the Community Development Advisory Board (Advisory Board) convened a public meeting at Treasury. Secretary Jacob J. Lew delivered opening remarks and swore in two new members. The Advisory Board provides advice to the Director of Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund) on the policies and activities of the CDFI Fund. CDFI Fund Director Annie Donovan presided over Wednesday’s program, which included discussions on current programs, the direction of the CDFI Fund, and presentations by professors Michael Swack and Gregory Fairchild on their recently published research on the CDFI Program .       Secretary Lew swears in new Advisory Board members  Calvin L. Holmes, President of the Chicago Community Loan Fund and  Brian E. Argrett, President and CEO of City First Bank of DC. At the meeting Director Donovan announced that the CDFI Fund has issued a Request for Proposals for a CDFI Fund Innovation Challenge. The goal of the Innovation Challenge is to finance the development of a method, model, tool, or product that Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) can use to build capacity to expand CDFI investments in underserved target markets, especially those that are in rural areas. The Innovation Challenge Request for Proposals is available at www.fedbizopps.gov .     The CDFI Fund was created to promote economic development and revitalization in America’s underserved and distressed low-income communities. Through its programs and resources, the CDFI Fund supports real estate developments, businesses, healthcare facilities, workforce training centers, and jobs in urban and rural areas across the county.  For more information on the impact of the CDFI Fund’s programs, please visit www.cdfifund.gov .   You may view Wednesday’s meeting here . Dan Cruz is a Media Specialist and Spokesperson for Domestic Finance at the U.S. Treasury Department. ​ ​
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Treasury Notes
In February, the Financial Stability Oversight Council (Council) adopted supplemental procedures regarding its process for designating nonbank financial companies, including important new transparency provisions. Among those changes was a commitment to provide further details explaining how the Council calculates the quantitative thresholds used during Stage 1 of its process. Today, staff released guidance that provides additional details on these calculations. This information will allow companies to better understand the Council’s calculations in Stage 1 and provide the public with greater insight regarding the Council’s work.  The staff guidance can be found here .​ For detailed information on the nonbank financial company designations process, including the recently adopted supplemental procedures, which describe the Council’s engagement with companies and new transparency measures, see the following documents:   Supplemental Procedures Relating to Nonbank Financial Company Determinations Frequently Asked Questions on Nonbank Financial Company Determinations Patrick Pinschmidt is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Financial Stability Oversight Council at the U.S. Department of the Treasury​.
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Treasury Notes
The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) today released the annual Strategic Sustainability and Energy Scorecards for federal agencies, including the U.S. Treasury Department.  The Obama Administration has issued executive orders ( Executive Order 13693 and Executive Order 13514 ) to ensure the federal government leads by example by improving environmental and economic performance.  Under these directives, federal agencies must m e e t a range of energy, wat e r, pollution, and waste reduction targets over the next decade.  Today’s scorecard helps Treasu r y identify and track the best opportunities to meet the targets, reduce pollution, i m prove efficiency, and cut costs.   Today’s scorecard shows that last year Treasury continued to exceed the targeted reductions in critical areas.  Based on previously established baselines, the Department reduced greenhouse gas e m iss i ons by 39 percent, shrunk fleet dependence on petr o le u m by 76.1 percent, and received 19.7 percent of its energy from renewable sources.  In other areas, there’s more that can be done. Going forward, Treasury will continue renovating buildings and consolidating offices, wherever possible, to optimize the use of energy and water in our building portfolio.   Throughout Treasury’s headquarters and bureaus we continue to make reductions in water and electricity, and we have prioritized procuring sustainable goods.  For example, the Bureau of the Fiscal Service is installing LED lighting to reduce electrical use.  The Internal Revenue Service has included bio-based requirements, such as bio-based plastic alternatives for items like packing materials, cups, and utensils and bio-based cleaning products (e.g. citrus-based cleaners), in more than 95 percent of relevant contracts. Additionally, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing is undertaking an initiative to recycle their cleaning solution in the currency manufacturing process, and this project is expected to save approximately 12 million gallons of water once completed.    Treasury is committed to demonstrating leadership in environmental stewardship in our operations, and we will continue our efforts to reduce our impact on the environment.   Please click here to review Treasury’s Fiscal Year 2014 Sustainability Scorecard .  ​ Brodi Fontenot is the Assistant Secretary for Management and Chief Sustainability Officer at the U.S. Treasury Department. 
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Treasury Notes
This afternoon, Treasury published the U.S. National Money Laundering Risk Assessment and the National Terrorist Financing Risk Assessment.  Given the breadth of issues covered and the significance of these reports, we’d like to take this opportunity to contextualize our efforts, and help readers understand how we expect others to use these national risk assessments. Why are we doing this? We undertook this review to help ensure the continued effectiveness of our anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) framework. The U.S. Government is responsible for developing and enforcing AML/CFT policy.  However, the strength of our framework to detect and deter illicit finance depends on whether industry stakeholders can effectively implement those policies – information about illicit methods, their impacts, and enforcement efforts is critical to helping them do this.  These risk assessments are one such source of information, meant to support our partners in both the public and private sectors as they develop programs to manage and combat relevant illicit finance risks. What are these assessments?  These assessments represent thorough work by the Treasury Department and the interagency to synthesize all relevant information and develop a comprehensive view of the illicit finance threats, vulnerabilities, and risks facing the U.S. financial system.  We hope that financial institutions and other stakeholders will use these assessments, in concert with other information sources, to bolster their understanding of the illicit finance risks they face.  Doing so should better enable stakeholders to implement AML/CFT programs in line with the “risk-based approach” – a method for identifying, assessing and understanding the risks to which they are exposed and taking proportional measures to address them. …and what are they not?  These assessments are not intended to be the sole source of information that stakeholders use as they develop their compliance efforts.  While our assessments contain a great deal of valuable information, there is no silver bullet in AML/CFT. Criminals will continue to develop new money laundering methods that are not addressed in these pages.  And some of the information in our assessments will not apply to every U.S. financial institution.  We expect institutions to identify and manage their own risk. What does the U.S. Government plan to do with this information? We expect U.S. financial institutions to remain vigilant in the fight against money laundering and terrorist financing – and we hold ourselves to the same high standards.  We will use the information in these assessments to continue to adjust or develop policies to ensure that we continue to effectively combat money laundering and terrorist financing.  And this information will be used as we continue to adjust our regulations to close any vulnerabilities we identify; one such example is our ongoing customer due diligence rulemaking.  Furthermore, we will remain unrelenting about identifying, assessing, and communicating the illicit finance issues that exist so that we can continue to make the U.S. financial system more safe and secure. Jennifer L. Fowler is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing and Financial Crimes at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.​  
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Treasury Notes
Last week, Treasury hosted the economic track of the U.S.–China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED).  The S&ED gave Secretary Lew and me, along with other senior officials from across the U.S. government, an opportunity to advance U.S. priorities on a range of economic issues with our Chinese counterparts.  Importantly, among other issues, Secretary Lew and I emphasized the importance of the Treasury-led effort to develop new international guidelines on government export financing.   Recently, this effort has made major advances that will bring our negotiations with China and other global providers of such financing to a pivotal new stage.  As we enter this new stage of work to discipline Chinese and other emerging market export financing, prompt re-authorization of the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im Bank) will be extremely important to maintaining U.S. leadership and making further progress in the negotiations.  Indeed, without Ex-Im Bank, not only will U.S. exports and jobs suffer, but so will Treasury’s ability to discipline the role of other governments in their provision of export financing.    Over the last decade, China has gone from being a marginal player in government-supported export finance to becoming the world’s largest provider.  According to some reports, in 2014, China provided more export financing support than all of the G-7 countries combined.  This would be less of a concern if China were a participant in the current set of guidelines on government-supported export financing housed at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).  It is crucial to our efforts that China actively engage in these negotiations and abide by the new international guidelines when they are completed.  If China and other emerging market countries do not participate in these guidelines, there will be continuing concerns that their export financing distorts trade, crowds out private finance, and puts U.S. exporters at a disadvantage.  In an effort to counter the dramatic increase in export financing support by China and other emerging market countries that do not participate in the current international guidelines, and with broad support from our G-7 partners, Treasury has led the effort to create the International Working Group on Export Credits (IWG).  Through the IWG, we are working to bring all major providers of government-supported export financing, including China and other emerging market countries, into a new set of guidelines.  At the same time that a new set of guidelines would promote a level playing field for U.S. exporters, they also would serve as an essential step toward curbing government-supported export financing globally.   Recent developments in the IWG negotiations, including those secured through the S&ED, will move the IWG into a new phase of negotiations later this year.  Rather than focusing on only a few sectors of the economy, the IWG will now negotiate guidelines that apply across virtually all sectors of the economy.  These negotiations will help to build a global framework for official export financing that promotes discipline and fiscal responsibility, and that helps to ensure that government export finance complements commercial finance – rather than competes with it.   Without a reauthorized Ex-Im Bank, U.S. exporters would be competing against foreign competitors that retain access to government-supported export finance –– potentially creating an uneven playing field.  Moreover, foreign governments would be less inclined to negotiate new guidelines with the United States because we will have given up our ability to counter the support they provide to their exporters.   Reauthorizing Ex-Im Bank is essential to maintaining a level playing field for U.S. exporters and to supporting U.S. jobs.  While Treasury will continue its effort to discipline the role of government in financing exports, without Ex-Im Bank, our leverage in this regard will be reduced.  Nathan Sheets is Under Secretary for International Affairs at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.​​  ​​
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PrNewswire
MIDDELHARNIS, Netherlands, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ --
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PrNewswire
DALLAS, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ --
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PrNewswire
SALT LAKE CITY, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Yesterday conjures up nostalgia, tomorrow is a promise. But today is harder to appreciate until moments happen that make us smile or laugh, or just feel good.
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PrNewswire
BOSTON, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Americans across the nation are being asked today to pause, "text less," and "live more," by Merritt's Way, an organization dedicated to raising awareness about the dangers of distracted driving and getting behind the wheel while texting or streaming on social media.
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PrNewswire
LOS ANGELES, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The national food safety law firm of Ron Simon & Associates, along with local counsel Gomez Trial Attorneys of San Diego, has filed a lawsuit stemming from Salmonella-contaminated chicken distributed by Foster Farms. Health officials have linked the tainted chicken to over 600 illnesses nationwide.
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PrNewswire
RIDGELAND, Miss., July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- C Spire, the first U.S. mobile provider to introduce rolling data plans, is helping consumers regain control of their mobile phone bills by stopping surprise overage charges that routinely cost them thousands of dollars a year.
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PrNewswire
LOUISVILLE, Ky., July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Brian Mahany, whistleblower lawyer and author, is scheduled to address the Mensa Annual Gathering in Louisville on July 3, 2015.
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PrNewswire
HONG KONG, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- uCloudlink is slated to initiate a revolutionary project for the world's first 4G global Wi-Fi hotspot: GlocalMe G2. Expected to be a very cool and effective product for businessmen and travelers around the world, GlocalMe's G2 project will be available on Kickstarter as of July this year.
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PrNewswire
IRVING, Texas, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The first results of BT's partnership with Williams Martini Racing are showing how BT technology is helping improve car performance with the team through real time pitstop practice data analysis, accelerated race video analysis, improved applications performance and real time telemetry. A new video case study can be streamed from www.bt.com/williams.
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PrNewswire
DALLAS, July 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ --
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